Reawakening Manners and Morality in Men

Friday Poetry Roses and Violets Edition

Rose

A collection of roses and violets poetry taken from around the web. They range from sweet to sappy. If you need help understanding the last one, find the closest geek and ask them to explain. Write your own roses and violets poetry in the comments below. Wow us with your awe inspiring creativity.

.

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Nothing in this crazy world
Could keep me from loving you

Roses are red
Violets are blue
These everyday things
Dont compare to you.

Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
I didnt start living,
Until I met you.

Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
Without you my dear wifey,
I dont know what Id do.

Roses are red
Violets are blue
On this day I feel special
I hope you do too

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Love is still fresh
Like the morning dew

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Nothing but death could
Separate me from you

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Sugar is sweet
Just like you

Roses are red
Violets are blue
I want everyone to know
That I love you!

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Fell in love the
Moment I saw you

Roses are red
Violets blue
You love me
And I love you

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Girl how I wish
I could buy both for you

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Come kiss me
And Ill kiss you

Roses are red
Violets are blue
But nothing is as strong
As my love for you

Roses are #ff0000
Violets are #0000ff
All my base
Are belong to you.

Valentines Gift Any Man Can Make In Minutes

poetry

Women love poetry.  It speaks to their souls and tells them that we care about them.  While many men will go to their local stores and pick out something cheesy from the Hallmark aisle, you sir will be creating a loving and thoughtful poem from scratch.  I know, many of you claim to not to be poetic, and in truth many of you are not.  We can fix that.

To craft a loving poem with a minimum of effort, thought, or actual poetic ability, we will use a literary form known as an acrostic.  I know, it sounds scary, but it’s really not. There are some famous and infamous acrostics that you’ve probably heard of, like Poe’s Elizabeth poem, or the Governators F*^% You veto letter.  We won’t be doing anything that elaborate.  Here is a simple acrostic example:

Intelligent Lovely Original Valuable Energetic Youthful Outstanding Upbeat

Do you see the hidden message in the first letters of the words? That’s what makes it an acrostic.  It is a constrained writing style where the first letter of each word combines to form another word or phrase.  In the example above, the first letters spell out I LOVE YOU.  It really is that simple.  You try one.  Here’s what you do:

  1. You pick a name or phrase
  2. You pick a bunch of adjectives that begin with the appropriate first letters
  3. You write them down
  4. You give them to your wife
  5. You get rewarded for being such a thoughtful romantic husband

I have some adjectives listed below if you need inspiration or get stuck on a particular letter.  I highly recommend not using X in your phrase if possible because the X-based adjectives are limited.  Once you have your acrostic finished, you need to give it to her, preferably on a card.  You can get as crafty as you want with this step, but no purchasing a card or you’ll lose points.  The simplest is to take a sheet of paper, fold it in half, and cut out a heart.  Write your acrostic on the front, I Love You, Happy Valentines Day on the inside and sign it.  There you go.  You now posses a hand crafted card containing an original poem made by you.  Be prepared for an enthusiastic response from the lady in your life, especially if this is wildly out of character for you.  If you need help making a card, download and print the template below.

heartcard

Alphabetical Adjectives for Incredible Inspiration and Passionate Poetry

Awesome Angelic Able Athletic Attractiverebecca

Beautiful Bold Blessed Brave Brilliant Buxom

Calm Creative Caring Compassionate Courageous Captivating

Delightful Daring Dependable

Eager Ernest Endearing Enthusiastic Exotic

Faithful Fierce Fantastic Frugal

Gorgeous Great Gracious Grateful Graceful Glamorous

Holy Humble Heroic Helpful Healer Hot

Insightful Innocent Intelligent Interesting Incredible

Just Jolly Joyful Jovial Jaunty

Kind Kissable Kinky Kindred

Loving Leader Luscious Lovely

Maternal Majestic Magnificent

Noble Nice Natural Naughty

Open Original Orderly Organized Optimistic

Quaint Qualified Quick Quiet Quirky

Real Reasonable Reverent Respectfulcatlin

Stellar Stupendous Sensuous Serious Sexy

Trustworthy Tasty Tantalizing Talented Tender

Upright Understanding Ultimate Unique

Valiant Voluptuous Voracious Vigorous Virtuous

Wonderful Wild Wise Warm Witty

Xerotic(dry) Xyloid(wooden) Xylophonic(melodic)

Youthful Yummy

Zany Zesty Zealous

Good Timber by Douglas Malloch

Timber

The tree that never had to fight
For sun and sky and air and light,
But stood out in the open plain
And always got its share of rain,
Never became a forest king
But lived and died a scrubby thing.

The man who never had to toil
To gain and farm his patch of soil,
Who never had to win his share
Of sun and sky and light and air,
Never became a manly man
But lived and died as he began.

Good timber does not grow with ease:
The stronger wind, the stronger trees;
The further sky, the greater length;
The more the storm, the more the strength.
By sun and cold, by rain and snow,
In trees and men good timbers grow.

Where thickest lies the forest growth,
We find the patriarchs of both.
And they hold counsel with the stars
Whose broken branches show the scars
Of many winds and much of strife.
This is the common law of life.

Paul Revere’s Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Paul Revere’s Ride

The Friday Poem below is somewhat romanticized, but I challenge you to consider yourself in Paul Revere’s situation.   As the images flow through your mind, look back into history and see yourself there; an army headed your way, a desperate ride to sound the alarm, to rouse and rally before everyone and everything you hold dear is destroyed before your very eyes.  Can you feel the horse beneath you, flanks heaving on your wild ride?  Is your heartbeat the only sound pounding in your ears?  In his place, do you have the mettle to do what you must?  Could this poem be titled John’s Ride, or Larry’s Ride, or Zack’s Ride, or Your Ride?

Paul Revere’s Ride

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,–
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,—
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,—
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

Lead Me – by Sanctus Real

Lead Me – by Sanctus Real

Sanctus Real’s Lead Me is a song that has earned itself a permanent place in my music rotation.  I think every man should listen to this song every morning as a reminder of why he’s getting out of bed, and what will be expected of him for the next 18 hours or so.  I find that this song’s powerful words really resonate with me.  Matt Hammitt, the lead vocalist and guitar player wrote the song after his wife had the courage to come to him and beg him to be a leader for their family.

Andrew Funderburks from New Release Tuesday interviewed the band shortly after their album Pieces of a Real Heart came out.  The following is an excerpt from that interview.

One song I know that is poignant for the band is “Lead Me.” Would you mind sharing the story behind the song?

It’s a pretty amazing song. Our lead singer, Matt Hammitt, had most of the song written. It was written after Matt and his wife had a pretty gut-wrenching conversation, where she told him that she needed him to be a better spiritual leader to her and their family. It rocked Matt’s world. They’re the ones who have been married the longest in the band. They’ve been married longer than I have. They already have two daughters and they’re expecting their third child right now. Matt said that he found it humbling that his wife would have the courage to say something like that out of love. Secondly, he realized that he had to do something about it. There was no way around it. We don’t believe in divorce. There were some things they had to work on to keep that open dialogue between the two of them, so that they could admit problems and work through them. That’s where the song came from.

The idea is actually at least a year and a half old. We had a rough idea of the song because he had a demo, but it got put in the pile. The president of our record label somehow found the song before we completely finished the record and said, “Something is going on with that song. I think it could really be turned into something special if you guys finish it.” Until he said that, we hadn’t even entertained the thought of putting the song on the record. When we went in the studio to finish the song with this writer from Nashville, the story came together perfectly. The song is kind of a father’s prayer for his family and wife. It’s an honest cry out to God saying, “If I’m going to lead my family, I need You to lead me.” I can say this because I didn’t have a lot to do with it. [Laughs.] I hope that hearing the story behind the song, and what went into writing it, will touch a lot of lives. It’s a powerful song!

You can catch the entire interview on New Release Tuesday’s Website.  While I wasn’t able to find an official music video for this song, I did find a pretty neat production by My Bridge Radio.  I think they did a fantastic job on this, and hope they continue to produce videos of this caliber.

 

Here are the lyrics, in case they didn’t instantly burn themselves into your soul.

I look around and see my wonderful life
Almost perfect from the outside
In picture frames I see my beautiful wife
Always smiling
But on the inside, I can hear her saying…

“Lead me with strong hands
Stand up when I can’t
Don’t leave me hungry for love
Chasing dreams, what about us?

Show me you’re willing to fight
That I’m still the love of your life
I know we call this our home
But I still feel alone”

I see their faces, look in their innocent eyes
They’re just children from the outside
I’m working hard, I tell myself they’ll be fine
They’re in independent
But on the inside, I can hear them saying…

“Lead me with strong hands
Stand up when I can’t
Don’t leave me hungry for love
Chasing dreams, but what about us?

Show me you’re willing to fight
That I’m still the love of your life
I know we call this our home
But I still feel alone”

So Father, give me the strength
To be everything I’m called to be
Oh, Father, show me the way
To lead them
Won’t You lead me?

To lead them with strong hands
To stand up when they can’t
Don’t want to leave them hungry for love,
Chasing things that I could give up

I’ll show them I’m willing to fight
And give them the best of my life
So we can call this our home
Lead me, ’cause I can’t do this alone

Father, lead me, ’cause I can’t do this alone

Matt put out a podcast with his wife giving more of the back story behind the song.  They knew they were having problems, but they took divorce right off the table.  If there is no escape route, you have no choice but to fight.  They fought for their marriage and came out stronger for it.  I hope more men can learn from his example.  It sickens me that the divorce rate in the church is no different than in the world.  As a geek, it annoys me when people leave their electronics set to forever blink 12:00 when they have a users manual that tells them how to fix the problem if they would only read it.  Well you know what?  Life comes with an instruction manual too.  If you want to salvage a marriage, or simply improve one, go READ THE MANUAL!  Looking at the smoldering remains of my keyboard, I do believe I’m going to have to write some more on this topic.  Anyway, go check out the video on youtube.